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Louise Rimmer

Louise Rimmer is an emerging writer, living in Merseyside with her partner, her two baby daughters and a phenomenally clumsy cat. She won the Sefton Libraries writing competition in 2016 and was a finalist in the HG Wells short story competition in 2017. She studied philosophy at Durham University and now works as a secondary school teacher. She loves surfing, loud guitars and painting her nails. Louise is an optimist; she enjoys writing about dark subject matter, in the hope that she can find the silver lining on even the most horrifying of rainclouds. 

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Jan Kaneen

Jan Kaneen was born in Bolton, Lancashire, the first of a family of chrome-platers to go to University. She left UCW Aberystwyth with joint honours in English and history and a two-year-old son. She spent the 90s in London, working on Indy magazines including The Modern Review and Everywoman. Now, two more sons and one husband later, she lives in the middle of nowhere in the Cambridgeshire fens, writing fiction. She began creative writing in 2014 to see if she could, and signed up with the Open University. She’s now in her final year of a Creative Writing MA, still at the Open University where she’s finishing her  collection of weird short stories, working title, Unfairy Stories – tales of the not always super natural. She’s won or been listed in oodles of short story and flash fiction competitions,  and been published round and about, most recently in Ellipsis ‘One’, Bath Flash Festival and Salome Magazine. She was nominated for a 2018 Pushcart and Best on the Net and blogs at https://jankaneen.com/ and tweets as @Jankaneen1

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Marc Joan

Marc Joan was brought up in India, and is a molecular biologist by training. He has lived and worked in Anglesey, Bristol, Cambridge, Geneva, London and East Anglia, and spent time in the US, Japan and Australia. He now lives near Guildford, where he subsists on tea and cynicism. Job obligations and family brouhaha limit his writing efforts to the very early morning, during which time wakefulness is maintained with carefully-positioned bulldog clips. Perhaps for this reason, Marc has come to believe that the purpose of fiction is: first, to make readers unwillingly suspend disbelief; then, to subject them to cruel and unusual metaphors; and finally to ensure that they suffer irreversible sequelae, including but not limited to existential angst, waking nightmares, poor moral fibre and weight gain around the hips. That said, sometimes, in some of his stories -- despite his best efforts -- something more worthy raises its innocent little head. Marc has had fiction published by magazines including Structo, Bohemyth, Literary Orphans, Smokelong Quarterly, Danse Macabre, Hypnos, Chroma, Bookends Review and Sein und Werden; and his novelette, The Speckled God, was published by Unsung Stories in Feb 2017. He has been long-listed for the Brighton Short Story prize; he was a published finalist in the Aesthetica Creative Writing Award 2017/2018; and he received a Special Mention in the Galley Beggar Short Story Prize 2017/2018. Other publications are forthcoming in Lighthouse literary journal, and in a Comma Press anthology. Marc can be contacted via www.marc-joan.com.

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Hannah Persaud

Hannah was born in Yorkshire but grew up in Nepal and India before returning to England to make the Cotswolds her home where she lives with her husband, children and dogs. She juggles writing with her part-time job as a Fundraising Consultant. She has been writing fiction for three years and short stories are her guilty pleasure in the spaces between editing her first novel. She is currently shortlisted for the Cambridge Short Story Prize and a very short story of hers was recently highly commended in the Flash 500 Flash Fiction competition. This year she has fiction being published by several online journals including Ellipsis Zine, Riggwelter Journal and the Cabinet of Heed. Last year she was runner up in the InkTears Short Story Contest and placed in numerous competitions, and the year before that she won the Fresher Writing Prize. Hannah is represented by Laura Macdougall of United Agents and hopes to introduce her novel to the world very soon. Hannah’s favourite saying is Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity (Seneca). www.hannahpersaud.com / @HPersaud

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A M Howcroft

Anthony Howcroft is author of the short story collection Nobody Will Ever Love You. His work has been broadly published in a variety of periodicals such as Writers Magazine USA, Words with Jam, and The London Magazine. His stories have also appeared in numerous anthologies and been broadcast on BBC Radio. He is a winner of the H E Bates Short Story Prize, and the Big Issue in the North Story Prize.Originally from Oxford, Anthony now lives in California, where he runs a cognitive computing software company that enables machines to collaborate in order to solve complex problems. He drinks far too much diet coke and is presently working on a non-fiction book which he hopes to publish later in 2018. 

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Michael Batchelor

Michael Batchelor lives and works in Leeds. He’s written only a handful of stories, and The Days to Come is the first to be published.

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Shannon Savvas

Shannon is a New Zealand writer who divides her time and living between New Zealand, England and Cyprus. She had a short story The Loneliness of the Long Distance Woman  published Headland’s inaugural issue January 2015. In 2016, she was shortlisted in the Retreat West competition. In 2017, she was shortlisted in the Page & Blackmore (NZ) competition, longlisted in the Bath Flash Fiction competition, shortlisted in the Bath Short Story Award and Highly Commended in the Word Factory Flash Fiction. She has one flash fiction on the Reflex Fiction 2017 longlist.

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Anthony Dandy

I have always loved writing. Going back to primary school days, through to high school, the highlight of my lessons was the weekly ‘composition,’ set by the English teacher. Sadly, my military career – spanning forty years – put any urges to write creatively onto a long-term back-burner – although in 2000 I achieved an A Grade in A Level English, as a result of a year-long correspondence course, whilst working full time with the Ministry of Defence in Whitehall. Also in 2000, I had an article published, in the ‘in-house’ British Army Review. Now I am semi-retired and seriously attending to my life-long itch to be a writer. It is only in the last year and a half that I have attempted to write my own short stories and flash fiction, whilst studying and completing a commercial writing course.  I have also begun the first draft of my first novel, a thriller, drawing from my lengthy experiences on military bases in war-torn Afghanistan. 

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T.E. Condon

T.E. Condon spends a lot of time writing stuff and occasionally finishes what she starts. She’s had some work published with Fish publishing, First Writer, Still Standen and has completed an MSt in Creative Writing at Oxford. She’s just finished a children’s novel and is a writing course junkie. She is also an accomplished athlete. One of these bio facts is not true.

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Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov (1860 – 1904) was a Russian playwright and short story writer, considered to be one of the greatest writers of short fiction. While some of his stories may seem dated to a modern reader, many of his innovations altered literature and proved a modernising force – such as the combination of comedy and tragedy in the same piece, and the emphasis on indirect action, taking place off-stage (or outside of the main narrative). Many writers have been inspired by Chekhov, including Tolstoy who was an early admirer (and peer), James Joyce, George Bernard Shaw and Virginia Woolf.  Although Hemmingway was a more grudging supporter, claiming that ‘Chekhov wrote about six good stories. But he was an amateur writer.’ Throughout most of his literary career, Chekhov was actually a practising doctor. His death was fictionalised in the short story Errand by Raymond Carver, and Chekhov’s body was famously transported to Moscow in a refrigerated railway car meant for oysters.

Source: Wikipedia

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Anna Nazarova-Evans

Anna Nazarova-Evans is a Russian Brit. Her writing reflects this doublethink, as she fully accepts both cultures without belonging to either. Her short story Creator’s Mistake won TSS competition in 2016.  Her fairy tale Big Blue Eyes was one of ten winners in Word Factory’s Fables for a Modern World competition. You can also find her work in National Flash-Fiction Day anthologies, Spelk Fiction, Café Aphra, Spontaneity, Reflex Fiction and Visual Verse. She is soon to be published by the Casket of Fictional Delights. Follow her on Twitter @AnitchkaNE

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Amy J Kirkwood

Amy J. Kirkwood writes primarily Middle Grade and Young Adult fiction. She is currently working on a Middle Grade novel, a ghost story about a selective mute in rural Ireland that could best be described as Evil Skellig meets Michael Morpurgo meets Brothers Grimm meets Something Else Entirely. The manuscript for her first YA novel, Blazers, was commended for the 2017 Pageturner Prize and her short stories have appeared most recently in The Mechanics’ Institute Review: Volume 14. She has also been shortlisted for The Short Story’s quarterly Flash Fiction competition and was longlisted for the Bath Short Story Award. Amy graduated with Distinction from her MA in creative writing at Birkbeck in 2016. She is a primary school teacher living in London and can be found on twitter at @amyjkirkwood

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Jude Higgins

Jude Higgins' flash fiction is published in NFFD anthologies, the Fish Prize anthology, Flash Frontier, the New Flash Fiction Review, Great Jones Street, The Nottingham Review and The Blue Fifth Review among other places. Her flash fiction pamphlet, The Chemist's House was published by V. Press, June 2017. She has been successful in many flash fiction contests and was short listed in the Bridport flash fiction prize, 2017. She is founder of the Bath Flash Fiction Award and Director of the Flash Fiction Festival, UK. judehiggins.com Judehwriter.

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Samantha White

Originally from Derbyshire, Samantha White lives in rural Australia where she spends her days looking after children and writing copy for small businesses. She has been writing fiction for as long as she can remember but has only recently started showing it to other people. She is currently writing a Masters thesis on literary representations of trauma and landscape. You can find her online at www.samanthawhitewriter.com

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Sharon Telfer

Sharon loves writing anything but author bios. She lives near York, working as a  freelance writer and editor specialising in social issues. She discovered flash fiction through Twitter in 2015. She’s won the Bath Flash Fiction Award, Hysteria Flash Fiction competition and the Thresholds Feature Writing Competition.

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Mandy Huggins

Mandy Huggins was brought up in Scarborough, where her parents taught her the importance of kindness, stories, travel and good wine. She moved to London in the 1990s, and now lives in West Yorkshire. Her travel writing and short fiction have been published in anthologies, travel guides and literary journals, as well as newspapers and magazines including The Guardian, The Telegraph, Reader’s Digest, Traveller, and Writers’ Forum. She appeared on BBC radio as part of Your Desert Island Discs, celebrating listeners’ music choices and stories, and her written piece to accompany the programme appears on the BBC website. Mandy’s travel writing has won several awards, including the British Guild of Travel Writers New Travel Writer Award in 2014, and her short stories have been placed and shortlisted in numerous competitions, including Bare Fiction, Fish, InkTears, English Pen, Cinnamon Press, and Bradt Travel Guides. In 2016 she was a runner-up in the Henley Literary Festival Short Story Competition and the Retreat West Flash Fiction Award. Her first collection of flash fiction, Brightly Coloured Horses, will be published by Chapeltown Books in autumn 2017. 

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Margaret Dakin

Margaret Dakin was born and lived most of her life in Brisbane. She came to writing comparatively late after an adventurous life working in various occupations, culminating in twenty years as a studio potter and a copper enameller. After retiring in 2002, she joined a writing group and discovered a love of short stories. Meeting with like-minded friends keeps her pushing her pen every week, with enough success to encourage her to continue. She is the Treasurer of the Society of Women Writers Qld. Inc.  Her stage and radio plays have been produced, one of them for the second time this year, and she is currently working on a musical.

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Stephanie Hutton

Stephanie Hutton is a writer and clinical psychologist in the UK. She has published her flash fiction, short stories and poetry online and in print. In 2016 she won the Writers HQ Competition, Ad Hoc Fiction, and Bibliophone 1000 Words Heard Competition, and was shortlisted for the Black Pear Press Short Story Competition and Brighton Prize. She believes in the therapeutic value of fiction and is currently working on a novel. Find her work at stephaniehutton.com.

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Peter Newall

Peter Newall lives in Sydney, Australia, but has spent many northern winters travelling through Central and Eastern Europe, pursuing the ghosts of the Habsburg Empire, the Soviet Union and his ancestors.  He speaks Russian and German inaccurately. He recently lived for a year in Odessa, Ukraine, where he sang for a popular local blues band. His stories have been published in England, the USA, Hong Kong and Australia, and his story The Luft Mensch was nominated for the Pushcart Prize in 2016. He began writing three years ago, from a desire to record somehow the transience of human feelings.

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