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FlashFiction

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Michael Batchelor

Michael Batchelor lives and works in Leeds. He’s written only a handful of stories, and The Days to Come is the first to be published.

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Shannon Savvas

Shannon is a New Zealand writer who divides her time and living between New Zealand, England and Cyprus. She had a short story The Loneliness of the Long Distance Woman  published Headland’s inaugural issue January 2015. In 2016, she was shortlisted in the Retreat West competition. In 2017, she was shortlisted in the Page & Blackmore (NZ) competition, longlisted in the Bath Flash Fiction competition, shortlisted in the Bath Short Story Award and Highly Commended in the Word Factory Flash Fiction. She has one flash fiction on the Reflex Fiction 2017 longlist.

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Anthony Dandy

I have always loved writing. Going back to primary school days, through to high school, the highlight of my lessons was the weekly ‘composition,’ set by the English teacher. Sadly, my military career – spanning forty years – put any urges to write creatively onto a long-term back-burner – although in 2000 I achieved an A Grade in A Level English, as a result of a year-long correspondence course, whilst working full time with the Ministry of Defence in Whitehall. Also in 2000, I had an article published, in the ‘in-house’ British Army Review. Now I am semi-retired and seriously attending to my life-long itch to be a writer. It is only in the last year and a half that I have attempted to write my own short stories and flash fiction, whilst studying and completing a commercial writing course.  I have also begun the first draft of my first novel, a thriller, drawing from my lengthy experiences on military bases in war-torn Afghanistan. 

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T.E. Condon

T.E. Condon spends a lot of time writing stuff and occasionally finishes what she starts. She’s had some work published with Fish publishing, First Writer, Still Standen and has completed an MSt in Creative Writing at Oxford. She’s just finished a children’s novel and is a writing course junkie. She is also an accomplished athlete. One of these bio facts is not true.

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Anna Nazarova-Evans

Anna Nazarova-Evans is a Russian Brit. Her writing reflects this doublethink, as she fully accepts both cultures without belonging to either. Her short story Creator’s Mistake won TSS competition in 2016.  Her fairy tale Big Blue Eyes was one of ten winners in Word Factory’s Fables for a Modern World competition. You can also find her work in National Flash-Fiction Day anthologies, Spelk Fiction, Café Aphra, Spontaneity, Reflex Fiction and Visual Verse. She is soon to be published by the Casket of Fictional Delights. Follow her on Twitter @AnitchkaNE

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Amy J Kirkwood

Amy J. Kirkwood writes primarily Middle Grade and Young Adult fiction. She is currently working on a Middle Grade novel, a ghost story about a selective mute in rural Ireland that could best be described as Evil Skellig meets Michael Morpurgo meets Brothers Grimm meets Something Else Entirely. The manuscript for her first YA novel, Blazers, was commended for the 2017 Pageturner Prize and her short stories have appeared most recently in The Mechanics’ Institute Review: Volume 14. She has also been shortlisted for The Short Story’s quarterly Flash Fiction competition and was longlisted for the Bath Short Story Award. Amy graduated with Distinction from her MA in creative writing at Birkbeck in 2016. She is a primary school teacher living in London and can be found on twitter at @amyjkirkwood

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Jude Higgins

Jude Higgins' flash fiction is published in NFFD anthologies, the Fish Prize anthology, Flash Frontier, the New Flash Fiction Review, Great Jones Street, The Nottingham Review and The Blue Fifth Review among other places. Her flash fiction pamphlet, The Chemist's House was published by V. Press, June 2017. She has been successful in many flash fiction contests and was short listed in the Bridport flash fiction prize, 2017. She is founder of the Bath Flash Fiction Award and Director of the Flash Fiction Festival, UK. judehiggins.com Judehwriter.

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Samantha White

Originally from Derbyshire, Samantha White lives in rural Australia where she spends her days looking after children and writing copy for small businesses. She has been writing fiction for as long as she can remember but has only recently started showing it to other people. She is currently writing a Masters thesis on literary representations of trauma and landscape. You can find her online at www.samanthawhitewriter.com

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Sharon Telfer

Sharon loves writing anything but author bios. She lives near York, working as a  freelance writer and editor specialising in social issues. She discovered flash fiction through Twitter in 2015. She’s won the Bath Flash Fiction Award, Hysteria Flash Fiction competition and the Thresholds Feature Writing Competition.

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Amanda Huggins

Mandy Huggins was brought up in Scarborough, where her parents taught her the importance of kindness, stories, travel and good wine. She moved to London in the 1990s, and now lives in West Yorkshire. Her travel writing and short fiction have been published in anthologies, travel guides and literary journals, as well as newspapers and magazines including The Guardian, The Telegraph, Reader’s Digest, Traveller, and Writers’ Forum. She appeared on BBC radio as part of Your Desert Island Discs, celebrating listeners’ music choices and stories, and her written piece to accompany the programme appears on the BBC website. Mandy’s travel writing has won several awards, including the British Guild of Travel Writers New Travel Writer Award in 2014, and her short stories have been placed and shortlisted in numerous competitions, including Bare Fiction, Fish, InkTears, English Pen, Cinnamon Press, and Bradt Travel Guides. In 2016 she was a runner-up in the Henley Literary Festival Short Story Competition and the Retreat West Flash Fiction Award. Her first collection of flash fiction, Brightly Coloured Horses, will be published by Chapeltown Books in autumn 2017. 

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Natalia Theodoridou

Natalia Theodoridou holds a PhD in Media & Cultural Studies from SOAS, University of London. She is the dramaturge of Adrift Performance Makers (@AdriftPM), and a writer of strange stories. Her work has been published in KROnline, Ninth Letter, Interfictions, Clarkesworld, and Neon, among other venues. It has also been translated into Greek, French, Italian, and Portuguese. Originally from Greece, Natalia has lived in the US, the UK, and Indonesia for several years. She is currently based in Exeter, UK. You can find out more at her website, www.natalia-theodoridou.com, or by following @natalia_theodor on Twitter. 

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Tric Kearney

Tric Kearney is a writer living in Cork, Ireland. She grew up among a large family, where competition to tell the most compelling or entertaining story at the dinner table was fierce. Emerging from the mists of being a stay at home mother to four children, she has finally found her writing voice. Tric was named, Best Writer at the Irish Parenting Blog Awards. Her blog, My Thoughts On A Page was voted Best Personal Blog at the same event. She writes a weekly humorous column in The Irish Examiner newspaper. She particularly enjoys writing short stories and flash fiction. Her story Goodnight Jimmy featured in the Imagine, Write, Inspire Anthology called The little book of love.

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Sharon Boyle

Sharon lives in East Lothian and writes around her part-time job and family life, hoping one day to be released from the former through the power of captivating and money-spinning words alone. She has had short stories and flash pieces published on-line and in magazines, including Writers’ Forum, The Moth and Sentinel Literary, and won first prize in the 2016 HISSAC short story award. She is currently studying an OU creative writing course.

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Mark Dixon

Some days, when Mark Dixon’s small but highly destructive children are safely tucked up in bed, he can summon up enough energy to put his imagination to work. He steals ideas without compunction - mostly from demode French philosophers of the 1980’s - folding their cues into whatever ridiculous weirdness he can hoover up from all his years of living. He cites influences that include Richard Brautigan, Victor Pelevin and Mark Danielewski. This year, Mark Dixon has been published by Sein Und Werden magazine and longlisted for the Storgy short story competition.

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Amanda O'Callaghan

Amanda O’Callaghan’s short stories and flash fiction have been published and won awards in Australia, UK, and Ireland. 
A former advertising executive, she studied English at King’s College London, and holds a PhD in English from the University of Queensland. She has been awarded a Queensland Literary Fellowship to complete her first collection of short stories. She lives in Brisbane.

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Ingrid Jendrzejewski

Ingrid Jendrzejewski grew up in southern Indiana and studied creative writing and English literature at the University of Evansville before going on to study physics at the University of Cambridge.  Her current research interests focus on representations of science, mathematics and technology in stage plays.  She has soft spots for reading,  programming, cryptic crossword puzzles and, of course, writing; her work has appeared in Vine Leaves, Eating My Words: The 2014 National Flash Fiction Day Anthology, The Fast-Forward Festival, The Sixth Yamadera Basho Memorial Museum English Haiku Collection and The Mainichi.

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Karen Lethlean

Karen Lethlean is a retired English teacher, whose essay ‘When Did We’ was included Caught in the Breeze: 10 Essays, concerning Australian identity published by Blemish Canberra. ‘The Fake One’ appeared in Journey: Experiences with Breast Cancer BusyBird Publishing. She won the Torquay Froth and Bubble literary festival competition in 2010. Karen’s work has been published in some literary magazines and has won writing awards such as runner up Winter Solstice, Wild Words.org with Red, Yellow & Black. In her other life Karen is a triathlete and has done Hawaii Ironman twice!

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Sandra Crook

Sandra Crook, a former Human Resources Manager, was born in the north-west of England, but after several years living and working in South Africa, Germany and Spain, and cruising the waterways of France in a Dutch barge, she has recently settled on the Dorset coast. Her writing career began in the late nineties, when two of her articles were published by the Financial Times Weekend supplement.  This pinnacle of journalistic success was, sadly, never again revisited, though further articles for regional and animal magazines were accepted before she began writing short fiction.  She has had short stories published in a number of anthologies, and enjoyed writing success in several competitions.  Shortly before turning her attention to relocating earlier this year, she won competitions in Flash 500, Writing Magazine and Writers’ Forum, and her story, Finn, was awarded second place in the 2015 Magic Oxygen Literary Prize by a panel of 19 judges from four continents. This year she also won both first and second prize in the Flash 500 Annual Short Story Competition with Triangles and Rosemary’s Baby.

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Alice Cairns & Mary Trend

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Alice Cairns & Mary Trend

Alice Cairns and Mary Trend are recent graduates who have been writing together since they were seven years old. At Oxford University they collaborated on a series of student plays, from a modern retelling of The Comedy of Errors to a Victorian era ghost story. Since graduating last year, they won Toasted Fiction Theatre's radio play competition and had their entry recorded in front of a studio audience. It will be released as a podcast on iTunes soon! They also write a blog - Milk & Honey - that looks at ways of relishing the reading experience by matching a book to the perfect season, snack and cup of tea! What's more, they were featured in an InkTears blogpost on how to write with a partner.

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