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Guðmundur Friðjónsson

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Guðmundur Friðjónsson from Iceland (1869 - 1944) was a writer, poet and farmer (and worked on his father’s farm when growing up) who lived at the town of Sandi in Aðaldalur. His work was published in many newspapers and magazines, and his brother was also a writer, as was his son – who wrote his father’s biography. As well as publishing poems, short stories and non-fiction articles, he also published a single novel in 1907 which received mixed reviews – and was considered both clever and immoral in chapters.

Source: Wikipedia

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Anton Chekhov

Anton Chekhov (1860 – 1904) was a Russian playwright and short story writer, considered to be one of the greatest writers of short fiction. While some of his stories may seem dated to a modern reader, many of his innovations altered literature and proved a modernising force – such as the combination of comedy and tragedy in the same piece, and the emphasis on indirect action, taking place off-stage (or outside of the main narrative). Many writers have been inspired by Chekhov, including Tolstoy who was an early admirer (and peer), James Joyce, George Bernard Shaw and Virginia Woolf.  Although Hemmingway was a more grudging supporter, claiming that ‘Chekhov wrote about six good stories. But he was an amateur writer.’ Throughout most of his literary career, Chekhov was actually a practising doctor. His death was fictionalised in the short story Errand by Raymond Carver, and Chekhov’s body was famously transported to Moscow in a refrigerated railway car meant for oysters.

Source: Wikipedia

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Charles Dickens

Charles John Huffam Dickens (1812 –1870) was an English writer and social critic. He is regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the twentieth century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison. Despite his lack of formal education, he edited a weekly journal for 20 years, wrote 15 novels, five novellas, hundreds of short stories and non-fiction articles, lectured and performed extensively and campaigned vigorously for children's rights, education, and other social reforms. His novels, most published in instalments, pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, which became the dominant Victorian mode for novel publication. His plots were carefully constructed, and he often wove elements from topical events into his narratives. Masses of the illiterate poor chipped in ha'pennies to have each new monthly episode read to them, opening up and inspiring a new class of readers.

(Source: Wikipedia)

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Lord Dunsany

Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany (1878 – 1957) was an Irish writer and dramatist, notable for his work, mostly in fantasy, published under the name Lord Dunsany. More than 80 books of his work were published, including many hundreds of short stories, as well as successful plays, novels (especially The King of Elfland’s Daughter) and essays. Born to the second-oldest title (created 1439) in the Irish peerage, Dunsany lived much of his life at what may be Ireland's longest-inhabited house, Dunsany Castle near Tara, was chess and pistol-shooting champion of Ireland, and travelled and hunted extensively. Dunsany's writing habits were considered peculiar by some. Apparently, he always sat on a crumpled old hat while composing his tales, and Dunsany almost never rewrote anything; everything he published was theoretically a first draft. Much of his work was penned with quill pens, which he made himself.                      

(Source: Wikipedia)

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Montague Rhodes James

More commonly known by his published name M. R. James, he was an English mediaeval scholar and provost of King's College, Cambridge (1905–1918), and of Eton College (1918–1936). He is best remembered for his ghost stories, which are regarded as among the best in the genre. James redefined the ghost story for the new century by abandoning many of the formal Gothic clichés of his predecessors and using more realistic contemporary settings. However, James's protagonists and plots tend to reflect his own antiquarian interests. Accordingly, he is known as the originator of the "antiquarian ghost story".

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Guy De Maupassant

Henri René Albert Guy De Maupassant was a popular 19th-century French writer, considered one of the fathers of the modern short story and one of the form's finest exponents. A protégé of Flaubert, Maupassant's stories are characterized by their economy of style and efficient, effortless dénouement. Many of the stories are set during the Franco-Prussian War of the 1870s and several describe the futility of war and the innocent civilians who, caught in the conflict, emerge changed. He authored some 300 short stories, six novels, three travel books, and one volume of verse.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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H.G. Wells

Herbert George Wells was a prolific English writer in many genres, including the novel, history, politics, and social commentary, and textbooks and rules for war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels, and Wells is called a father of science fiction. His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), and The War of the Worlds (1898).

 

Wells's earliest specialized training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context. He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. His later works became increasingly political and didactic, and he wrote little science fiction, while he sometimes indicated on official documents that his profession was that of journalist. 

 

 

Source: Wikipedia

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Damon Runyon

Damon Runyon was an American newspaperman and author. He was best known for his short stories celebrating the world of Broadway in New York City that grew out of the Prohibition era. To New Yorkers of his generation, a "Damon Runyon character" evoked a distinctive social type from the Brooklyn or Midtown demi-monde. The adjective "Runyonesque" refers to this type of character as well as to the type of situations and dialog that Runyon depicted. He spun humorous and sentimental tales of gamblers, hustlers, actors, and gangsters, few of whom go by "square" names, preferring instead colorful monikers such as "Nathan Detroit," "Benny Southstreet," "Big Jule," "Harry the Horse," "Good Time Charley," "Dave the Dude," or "The Seldom Seen Kid." His distinctive vernacular style is known as "Runyonese": a mixture of formal speech and colorful slang, almost always in present tense, and always devoid of contractions. He is credited with coining the phrase "Hooray Henry", a term now used in British English to describe an upper-class, loud-mouthed, arrogant twit. Runyon's fictional world is also known to the general public through the musical Guys and Dolls based on two of his stories, "The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown" and "Blood Pressure". The musical additionally borrows characters and story elements from a few other Runyon stories, most notably "Pick The Winner." 

Source: Wikipedia

 

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